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Real Rap is Back Cincinnati Music Concert

July 14, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 11:00 pm


Hamilton County Fairgrounds

$25 – $60
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You don’t want drama! Get your tickets to this genre-defining Hip-Hop Cincinnati music concert featuring 8Ball & MJG!

 

Calling all rap and hip-hop music lovers to a new Cincinnati music concert that will blow you away! This year will definitely be a year to remember as some of the most influential artists of our time. Real Hip-Hop is Back will feature 8Ball & MJG, Bun B, Beanie Sigel, Freeway, Case and more.

 

It will all go down at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds located at 7700 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH 45216. The concert begins at 5:00 p.m. Food trucks will be available, so grab a bite to eat before or after the concert.

 

Tickets prices range from $25.00 – $60.00 and may be purchased online, or by visiting Exclusive Wear, Hard Ta Knock Shoppe, Vengeance and Black Owned.

 

*Ticket buyers must bring ID, Order Number, and the credit card used to purchase to the venue. Physical tickets will not be issued – names will be on a list at the door. The cardholder must be present to gain admission.*

 

CALLING ALL FOOD TRUCK OWNERS!

If you own a food truck and would like to be apart of this event, apply by calling 513-557-9002. The vendor fee is $800.00.

 

Bun BRapper Bun B (born Bernard Freeman) rose to fame in the duo UGK. Bun B and Pimp C formed UGK in the late ’80s when their former crew, Four Black Ministers, fell apart. Based in Port Arthur, Texas, UGK signed with Jive, and with 1992’s Too Hard to Swallow began a series of Southern gangsta rap albums that were successful sellers. Bun B formed the side project Mddl Fngz in 2000, but his main concern was still UGK. Things came to halt in 2003 when Pimp C was given eight years in prison for a  gun assault charge. Bun B became a solo artist, making numerous appearances on other artists’ tracks and then in 2005 releasing both the mixtape Legends and his debut album, the Rap-a-Lot release Trill, a Top Ten hit. With Pimp C seeing an early release in late 2005, Bun B returned to UGK and a self-titled double album from the duo dropped in 2007. Tragedy struck in early 2008 when Pimp C died suddenly, leaving Bun B to return to a solo career. His second solo album, II Trill, arrived that same year with his third, Trill O.G., following in 2010. In 2013 he closed the Trill series with the fourth and final effort, Trill O.G.: The Epilogue.

 

CaseA native New Yorker, Case got his start in the music biz in the ’90s, singing backup on albums by several renowned R&B artists (such as Usher). Signed to the Def Jam label in the mid-’90s, Case issued his self-titled debut in 1996, followed by Personal Conversation in 1999 and Open Letter in 2001. On the latter release, Case wrote each song with a different person in mind (“A Song for Skye” was written for his daughter, while the tracks “Love of My Life” and “Shine” were inspired by the great Stevie Wonder). In 2004 he asked to be released from his Def Jam contract in order to launch his own label, Indigo Blue. In 2009 The Rose Experience became the first release for the label. He switched to Real Talk Entertainment for 2010’s Here, My Love, and moved to eOne for 2015’s Heaven’s Door.

 

Philadelphian rapper Beanie Sigel had a rapidly rising career, beginning with his appearance on one of underground rapper/producer DJ Clue?’s mixtapes, to his cameos on Jay-Z’s Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life, to a consequent solo deal with Roc-a-Fella Records. His distinctive, slightly drawling delivery and his clever but hard-hitting rhymes were showcased on his debut album, 2000’s The Truth, which featured contributions from Jay-Z, Memphis Bleek, Eve, and Scarface, and production by the Ruff Ryders’ Swizz Beatz and Suave House’s Tony Draper. His second album, The Reason, hit the streets in summer 2001, led by the single “Beanie (Mack B****).” Sigel soon launched his State Property line of clothing by announcing his gear would have hidden pockets and gun holsters.

 

8 Ball MJGOne of the pioneers of Southern rap, 8Ball and MJG, emerged from Memphis, Tennessee in the early ’90s and, aligned with the Houston, Texas-based independent label Suave Records, quickly garnering a tremendous regional following while proving highly influential to a generation of aspiring, independent-minded rap artists and entrepreneurs. The pioneering duo enjoyed increasing recognition as the years passed, releasing a couple albums, namely Comin’ Out Hard (1994) and In Our Lifetime, Vol. 1 (1999), which would become Southern rap milestones, along with classic singles like “Space Age Pimpin’.” 8Ball and MJG eventually left Suave for a major label, JCOR/Interscope, in 2000, and were signed by Diddy to Bad Boy Records, resulting in their most commercially successful album to date, Living Legends (2004). In addition, 8Ball and MJG recorded individually, the former by far the more prolific of the two. Despite never crossing over into the mainstream — none of their singles ever broke into the Billboard Hot 100; for example, not even once they signed to Bad Boy — and despite occasionally infrequent output, 8Ball and MJG persevered over the decades.

 

FreewayFreeway fast became a valuable member of the Roc-a-Fella family in the early 2000s. His first major appearance was in 2000, on “1-900-Hustler” — a track on Jay-Z’s Dynasty Roc la Familia album. A critical point came just after the album’s release when the MC was arrested for dealing drugs. Forced to choose between two careers, he opted to stay in hip-hop, releasing the excellent debut full-length Philadelphia Freeway in early 2003. At the same time, Freeway was part of the State Property collective. Three years later, Roc-a-Fella finally issued Free’s second album, Free at Last. Upon severing ties with Roc-a-Fella, he issued the no-frills 2009 album Philadelphia Freeway 2 (Real Talk), as well as 2010’s The Stimulus Package (Rhymesayers), a collaboration with Jake One. He issued the solo album Diamond in the Ruff in 2012 then collaborated with mash-up producer Girl Talk on the 2013 EP Broken Ankles. In 2015 a routine doctor’s visit revealed kidney failure that required dialysis and the search for a donor. These struggles helped inspire the MC’s 2016 solo album, Free Will.

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